20+ Best Tiny Flowers To Add Color for Your Garden

1. Baby’s Breath (Gypsophila)

 

You may know baby’s breath best as a filler in Valentine’s bouquets, but this perennial flower shines in the garden. Although these tiny white flowers and thin, wispy stems look delicate, they are quite resilient in the landscape. Plants thrive in dry, average soil, but this plant prefers alkaline conditions, making it ideal for rock gardens. ‘Bristol Fairy’ is a reliable performer and will bloom from April until the end of summer.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 9
  • Color Varieties: White, pink, orange, red, yellow, and purple
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil Needs: Alkaline
  • Mature Size: 2-3 ft. tall
  • Deer Resistant: Yes

 

2. Fairy Foxglove (Erinus alpinus)

 

Also known as starflower and alpine blossom, Erinus alpinus features feather-like petals and dark green stems. This plant can be grown from seed; however, starting fairy foxglove flowers with a mature plant acquired from a nursery is easier. They will happily grow in any rock crevice or wall. Unlike many rock garden plants, fairy foxglove will grow in partial shade.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 7
  • Color Varieties: Pink, purple, and white
  • Sun Exposure: Full and partial sun
  • Soil Needs: Any
  • Mature Size: 2-3 in. tall
  • Deer Resistant: Yes

 

3. Forget-Me-Not (Myosotis)

 

If you struggle to find a pretty plant for your woodland garden that rabbits and deer won’t eat, try low-maintenance forget-me-not. This short-lived perennial readily self-seeds and will continue to produce flowers for many years when planted in moist areas. The plants are covered in bright blue flowers with cheerful yellow eyes in April and May.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 8
  • Color Varieties: Blue, white, pink, and yellow
  • Sun Exposure: Full and partial sun
  • Soil Needs: Moist, well-drained
  • Mature Size: 1 ft. tall and wide
  • Deer Resistant: Yes

 

4. Kenilworth Ivy (Cymbalaria muralis)

 

Part of the charm of Cymbalaria muralis, also called ivy-leaved toadflax, is the attractive scalloped foliage that adds texture to the landscape even when the lavender flowers aren’t blooming. However, that doesn’t happen much, as the plants can remain in bloom from spring until fall in moist soils with some afternoon shade. Kenilworth ivy is only hardy in zones 6 and higher, but self-seeding in colder climates is common.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 6 to 11
  • Color Varieties: Lavender
  • Sun Exposure: Partial sun
  • Soil Needs: Moist
  • Mature Size: 2-3 in. tall
  • Deer Resistant: Yes

 

5. Lobelia (Lobelia erinus)

 

The true-blue flowersof the annual Lobelia erinus are a popular filler plant in early spring containers and hanging baskets. New varieties of this plant ensure that blossoms won’t fade when the weather heats up. When nights get hot, shear the plant and keep it hydrated for a repeat bloom.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 6 to 8
  • Color Varieties: Blue
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil Needs: Well-drained
  • Mature Size: 6-9 in. tall
  • Deer Resistant: Yes

 

6. Rock Cress (Arabis)

 

If you aren’t familiar with rock cress, there are more than a dozen hybrids to start your collection, including the brilliant purple ‘Axcent Lilac.’ In mid to late spring, the evergreen foliage sports hundreds of pink, purple, or blue flowers on 2 to 4-inch plants. Trim the plants after blooming to maintain the compact, mounding shape.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 7
  • Color Varieties: Pink, purple, and blue
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil Needs: Well-drained, slightly acidic
  • Mature Size: 4-9 in. tall
  • Deer Resistant: Yes

 

7. Snow-In-Summer (Cerastium tomentosum)

 

Snow-in-summer is a robust perennial with a silver cast to the foliage and abundant white flowers. This versatile plant works well as an accent along border edges and as a filler between garden pavers or crevices. The plants are excellent rock garden candidates, thriving in full sun and sharply draining soils. Snow in summer is hardy down to zone 3, making it a welcome addition to alpine gardens.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 7
  • Color Varieties: White
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil Needs: Well-drained
  • Mature Size: 6-12 in. tall
  • Deer Resistant: Yes

 

8. Sweet Alyssum (Lobularia maritima)

 

The fragrance of tiny sweet alyssum blooms is so sweet that it’s often compared to fresh honey. In early spring, these plants are standard offerings in garden centers everywhere. You can also grow a range of luscious flowers in Easter egg hues from seed. The seeds germinate quickly, sometimes in less than a week, and transplants thrive in cool spring weather. Give your sweet alyssum a trim when blooming gets sparse to rejuvenate the plant.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 7 to 11
  • Color Varieties: Pink, orange, white, yellow, and red
  • Sun Exposure: Full and partial sun
  • Soil Needs: Rich, loamy soil with a neutral pH
  • Mature Size: 3-10 in. tall
  • Deer Resistant: Yes

 

9. Thyme (Thymus vulgaris)

 

It’s always a bonus when a plant can do double duty in the garden, and thyme fulfills that role nicely. Many cultivars act as a flowering ground cover and culinary herb, such as ‘Italian Oregano’ thyme. The leaves grow in clusters on thin stems and add a savory essence to soups and vegetables throughout the growing season. All varieties of thyme need full sun and good drainage, and the plants respond well to shearing after spring blooms begin to fade. The purple blossoms will return a few weeks later, attracting native bees and beneficial wasps.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 2 to 10
  • Color Varieties: Purple
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil Needs: Well-drained
  • Mature Size: 2-6 in. tall
  • Deer Resistant: Yes

 

10. Dianthus (Dianthus spp.)

 

Dianthus flowers are also called “pinks,” not just because many of them come in pink but because the fringed flower petals’ edges look like pinking shears have frayed them. They are treasured for their long-lived blooms, clove-like scent, and ease of care. Many varieties are available, including hardy annuals, biennials, and perennials. Hummingbirds, bees, and other pollinators also favor these lovely, bright-colored flowers.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 3-9
  • Color Varieties: Pink, purple, white, yellow, red, or bi-colored
  • Sun Exposure: Full
  • Soil Needs: Moist, well-draining
  • Mature Size: 6-36 in. tall
  • Deer Resistant: Yes

 

11. Pansy (Viola x wittrockiana)

 

Pansies stand out in a crowd with their face-like, inkblot center markings; they’d scream, “I’ve got personality,” if they could. Most pansies don’t get big; some might cascade a little bit. To encourage more blooms, deadhead the flowers once they’ve faded. A pansy’s biggest downfall is the high heat of summer, but if you give them ample water and some shade in the blazing afternoon sun, they might hold on. Otherwise, you’ll have more luck with them in the spring and fall.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 4-8
  • Color Varieties: White, yellow, purple, blue
  • Sun Exposure: Full, partial
  • Soil Needs: Well-drained
  • Mature Size: 4-8 in. tall
  • Deer Resistant: No

 

12. Creeping Phlox (Phlox stolonifera)

 

Phlox grows in many sizes, including low-spreading, creeping, and tall garden phlox. The plant varieties feature large clusters of tiny, long-lasting flowers, beginning in early spring, enduring the hot summer, and holding on until the first frost. These perennials handle full to partial sun and prefer rich, well-drained soil. Deadhead these flowers to encourage more blooms. Bees, other pollinators, and hummingbirds visit these flowers.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 5-9
  • Color Varieties: Purple, pink, white
  • Sun Exposure: Full, partial
  • Soil Needs: Loamy, well-draining
  • Mature Size: 6-12 in. tall
  • Deer Resistant: Yes

 

13. Lily of the Valley (Convallaria majalis)

 

Lily of the valley flowers are petite, fragrant, bell-shaped white flowers that gracefully suspend from long stems. They are deceptively enticing; all parts of the plant are toxic to pets and humans. They also have a habit of spreading aggressively; contain or dig them up and divide them, so they don’t overgrow in your garden or overtake your other plants.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 3-8
  • Color Varieties: White
  • Sun Exposure: Partial, shade
  • Soil Needs: Well-draining
  • Mature Size: 6-12 in.
  • Deer Resistant: Yes

 

14. Egyptian Star Clusters (Pentas lanceolata)

 

Egyptian star clusters look like 4-inch bunches of 5-pointed stars that attract bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds to their nectar-rich flowers that grow in clusters over a long period. They’re also called pentas and produce flowers in red, pink, and purple shades. This subtropical plant mainly grows as an annual, but in warmer zones, such as zone 10, it is a perennial. This plant will benefit from deadheading to extend its blooming period.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 10-11
  • Color Varieties: Red, pink, lavender, white
  • Sun Exposure: Full, partial
  • Soil Needs: Rich, well-draining
  • Mature Size: 24-36 in
  • Deer Resistant: Yes

 

15. Primrose (Primula spp.)

 

Primroses produce beautiful umbrels of colorful flowers that arise on sturdy stalks in spring. Some varieties have flower clusters on a single stem or only one flower per stem. Most are low-growing and prefer partial sun, although they can tolerate full sun with frequent watering. Divide these perennials to prevent them from overgrowing in one area. Primroses are hardy in zones 3 to 8 and can be grown annually in other zones but cannot survive long in zone 9 and up because they need cool temperatures to survive and bloom.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 3-8
  • Color Varieties: Red, pink, orange, yellow, blue, purple, white
  • Sun Exposure: Partial, shade
  • Soil Needs: Moist, well-drained
  • Mature Size: 6-20 in.
  • Deer Resistant: Yes

 

16. Butterfly Bush (Buddleja davidii)

 

Depending on the cultivar, butterfly bush can grow tall, up to 12 feet, or shorter, like 3 feet. It produces impressive sprays or clusters of tiny flowers of many colors in the summer. They thrive in full sun and self-seed; they can overgrow an area quickly if not controlled. In warmer zones, butterfly bush is deciduous, only losing its leaves. It will die back to the ground in colder regions but will return in the spring.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 5-9
  • Color Varieties: Purple, pink, blue, white, yellow
  • Sun Exposure: Full
  • Soil Needs: Moist, well-draining
  • Mature Size: 3-12 ft.
  • Deer Resistant: Yes

 

17. Lavender (Lavendula spp.)

 

Lavender is a perennial herb known for its tiny, fragrant purple flowers that are sparsely arranged on spikes. It’s a plant that appreciates full sun and tolerates drought. The trick for producing flowers with this plant is to allow it to dry out before watering it. It grows moderately, often adding a few inches to its size each year.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 5-9
  • Color Varieties: Purple
  • Sun Exposure: Full
  • Soil Needs: Dry, well-draining
  • Mature Size: 2-3 ft.
  • Deer Resistant: Yes

 

18. Butterfly Weed (Asclepias tuberosa)

 

Butterfly weed is a huge favorite of bees and butterflies, producing tiny bright orange or yellowish flowers blooming in clusters in summer. This plant fares best in full sun and can tolerate drought. The easy-growing native doesn’t seem to attract deer or rabbits, but it’s a big-time aphid magnet. Whatever you do to get rid of the aphids, refrain from pesticides since this plant is a primary food source for monarch butterflies.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 3-9
  • Color Varieties: Orange, yellow
  • Sun Exposure: Full
  • Soil Needs: Dry, well-drained
  • Mature Size: 1-2 ft.
  • Deer Resistant: Yes

19. Lantana (Lantana camara)

 

Lantanas bloom in summer with clusters of tiny, bright-colored flowers in a mix of yellow, orange, white, red, pink, blue, or purple, sometimes bi-colored too. Butterflies and hummingbirds are attracted to this plant’s flowers. It has rough, citrusy leaves that deter deer. It grows in full sun, well-draining soil and is hardy in zones 7 to 11. In cooler zones, plant it as an annual. It is invasive in warmer parts of the U.S., such as Florida, Hawaii, and Arizona.2

  • USDA Growing Zones: 7-11
  • Color Varieties: Red, orange, yellow, blue, white, pink, purple
  • Sun Exposure: Full
  • Soil Needs: Well-draining
  • Mature Size: 6 ft.
  • Deer Resistant: Yes

 

20. Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)

 

Yarrow is a long-lasting perennial plant with tiny flat flower clusters that can spread aggressively. Deadhead its flowers to prevent it from spreading its seed. It blooms from summer to fall. Its pollen-rich flowers attract bees, butterflies, and other pollinators. Once established, it is drought tolerant.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 3-9
  • Color Varieties: Purple, white, yellow, pink, orange, red, bi-colored
  • Sun Exposure: Full
  • Soil Needs: Well-drained
  • Mature Size: 2-3 ft.
  • Deer Resistant: Yes

 

21. Heather (Calluna vulgaris)

 

Heather is a small, woody perennial shrub that blooms from midsummer to early fall, producing tiny mauve, purple, or white flowers. It also has tiny (1/8 inch long), evergreen, scale-like leaves. Heather is slow-growing, preferring a moist, acidic habitat, much like the heathlands of Scotland, where it comes from. It is invasive in a few spots with bogs, such as North Carolina, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 4-6
  • Color Varieties: Mauve, purple, white
  • Sun Exposure: Full, partial
  • Soil Needs: Sandy, moist
  • Mature Size: 24 in.
  • Deer Resistant: Yes

 

22. Stonecrop (Sedum)

 

Sedum or stonecrop are succulent plants favored by bees, with over 600 species that can be low-growing or tall and upright. They all have clusters of tiny, star-shaped flowers in many colors that bloom late in the growing season. They also have interesting foliage that makes them a good choice for planting as edging, ground covers, and in container gardens.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 3-10
  • Color Varieties: Red, pink, yellow, white
  • Sun Exposure: Full, partial
  • Soil Needs: Sandy, loamy, well-drained
  • Mature Size: 6-24 in.
  • Deer Resistant: Depends on the species

 

23. Queen Anne’s Lace (Daucus carota)

 

If you’ve ever grown carrots in your garden and left them in the ground too long, before you know it, sprouting from the carrot tops is Queen Anne’s lace. The stalks can grow up to 7 feet tall, while the flowers are tiny and white, with a deep purple floret in the center. They look beautiful in a wildflower garden with a delicate, lace-like look. However, they can be considered a weed and self-seed readily. Deadhead this plant to prevent its aggressive spread.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 3-10
    • Color Varieties: White
    • Sun Exposure: Full, partial
    • Soil Needs: Loose, well-draining
    • Mature Size: 6-7 ft.
    • Deer Resistant: Yes

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